Whaddyadoallday? Real Life on a Desert Island Rotating Header Image

June, 2015:

Just Don’t Call Me Late for Dinner

When I graduated from veterinary school I was Dr. Molek. At least on paper. But I never really went by Doctor. That was due to a combination of the laid back California lifestyle and Michael (whose clients always called him Mike). So I became just Georgia with a stethoscope. Not even Georgia with a white coat and a stethoscope. I never wore a white coat, either. Sometimes pearls, often times heels, but never a white coat. I’ll always remember running into a New England born and raised classmate of mine and ‘business attire’ came up in the conversation. She was so happy to be at a meeting where she could dress casually. And I said, ‘this is how I dress at work’. And she said, ‘not in jeans and stuff, right?’ Long story short she actually asked me, ‘how do your clients know to believe what you say if you aren’t wearing a white coat?’ And my response was, ‘I’d like to think they believe what I say because I make sense when I say it.’

Anyway, never really Dr. Molek. And all those years in California certainly never Dr. Paul. Michael was old fashioned enough to want me to change my name when we got married but didn’t want to confuse people by having two Drs. Paul practicing within 50 miles of each other. So I was, on paper, both Mrs. Paul and Dr. Molek. Even after we moved down here, my dual life continued so long as we rented our house during high season and traveled back to California where I’d return to veterinary medicine for a few months at a time. Mrs. Paul in Anguilla. Dr. Molek in California.

Now that I am finally working as a veterinarian in Anguilla, I have, at long last, completely morphed into one, single being. Remember, though, that this is an island that is fond of nicknames (SEE http://whaddyadoallday.com/?p=156) and unusual monikers though inexplicably the post office and the bank cannot or will not make the casual or legal connection between Mike Paul and Michael Paul being one and the same. Anyway it made me laugh when one of my very first clients asked me what she should call me. (Georgia, of course.) But apparently she and another client, a good friend of hers, had been debating the point and had settled on Mrs. Pelican (for Pelican Mobile PetCare). Worked for me.

Then the other day, in my professional capacity, I left a business card with an office receptionist so that she could call me back when she had the answer/document I had requested. Shortly thereafter my phone rang. The number was not entered into my caller ID but it quickly became clear that this particular individual was calling me back….as she started stuttering over how to address me on the phone with a hodgepodge of names and titles: Partially my fault since the business cards lists both my name and Michael’s name, and Georgia might register as George with a cursory glance. Then you can throw in the common confusion over whether Paul is the first name or the last name along with the added question in a Commonwealth country of whether or not a veterinarian is a Mr. or Ms. Or a Doctor. (By the way, a quick Wikipedia search reveals that just in March of this year the Royal College of Veterinary Surgeons in the UK finally voted to permit its members to use the title “Doctor”.)

We muddled through the phone call, and when I arrived to pick up the document I offered that I didn’t tend to stand on formality and that she should feel free to call me Georgia. I then suggested that since we would likely be crossing each other’s paths again in the future, it might be good for me to know her name. Her response? Miss Johnson.* Classic.

(Names have been changed to protect someone.)